The Nightly News
An Astronomy blog by Joe Bauman, Salt Lake City
Blog 52: Life on Mars?
Joe Bauman
07
June
2018

More Posts

  1. Blog 53: Diamond brooches
    17 Jun, 2018
    Blog 53: Diamond brooches
    An unforgettable experience at the eyepiece, almost akin to seeing Saturn, is one's first look at a globular cluster. Hanging in the black of space is a spherical mass of stars whose center is so tightly packed that individual orbs cannot be picked out, while around the ball are stellar streamers and loops, the whole conglomeration glowing like gems. They are a galaxy's brilliant diamond brooches. As far as we know, star clusters are of two types, open and globular (the preferred pronunciation
  2. Blog 51: Ready for prime time, it's Jupiter
    27 May, 2018
    Blog 51: Ready for prime time, it's Jupiter
    Jupiter, our solar system's king of planets, has been known as a special light in the sky probably since early humans stopped scratching long enough to look up. It and the other anciently-known planets are distinguished from the stars by relative brightness (most), their propensity to wander and their refusal to twinkle. The ancient Greeks named it Zeus, after the ruler of the gods, and the Romans carried on with their own version of the name, which we use today. As Bruce McClure of
  3. Blog 50: Astronomical fun
    19 May, 2018
    Blog 50: Astronomical fun
    I was stoked for my astronomy trip Wednesday. For the first time in many months, my telescope was repaired, the new camera system was fixed, weather predictions were for mostly clear skies and the moon would set early. I reviewed the night's most interesting photographic subjects and wrote this list of possibilities -- "For May 16, 2018: "NGC 4438 (and NGC 4435), 'The Eyes,' in the Virgo Galaxy, part of Markarian’s Chain. Take a deep exposure, with long subs, to pick up the many smaller
  4. Blog 49: Join the battle against light pollution
    07 May, 2018
    Blog 49: Join the battle against light pollution
    Civilization is losing a vital force that mystified and inspired humans for thousands of years: the dark night sky. Until about a century ago it was a universal source of awe, beauty and spiritual feelings; an anchor for legends; a cosmic signal about when to plant, and an ever-present reminder of Nature’s cycles. Now the resource is destroyed in many regions throughout the world. Of course, the impacts are worst in cities, towns and suburban areas. A photograph of nighttime Salt Lake City